Grief Support

One of life’s most significant challenges is experiencing the death of a loved one. Grief is the word we use to describe the internal thoughts and feelings that commonly occur in response to loss. It is a core human experience that has existed throughout history and is observed in every culture. At Sharon S. Richardson Community Hospice, our team is dedicated to providing you with tools to navigate the waves of emotion you may encounter on your grief journey.

Grief Support

One of life’s most significant challenges is experiencing the death of a loved one. Grief is the word we use to describe the internal thoughts and feelings that commonly occur in response to loss. It is a core human experience that has existed throughout history and is observed in every culture. At Sharon S. Richardson Community Hospice, our team is dedicated to providing you with tools to navigate the waves of emotion you may encounter on your grief journey.

Cup of Hope
Bereavement Care
Anticipatory Grief
Garden Remembrances
Cup of Hope
Bereavement Care
Anticipatory Grief
Garden Remembrances

Cup of Hope

Will I ever feel normal again? I thought grief was an emotional process, so why do I feel physical pain? How long will this last?

The pain of grief is very real. Although grieving is a normal reaction to loss, it still feels very abnormal, and every grieving person handles the process at their own pace, in their own way.

You will find compassionate care at our Cup of Hope grief support group. Here, we welcome our patients, their loved ones, and anyone in the community who needs gentle help through the grieving process.

Meetings are free to attend and are held the fourth Wednesday of each month from 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and on the third Thursday of each month from 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. No pre-registration is required.

To learn more about our Grief Support programs or private counseling, please call 920-467-1800.

Our Bereavement Coordinator is specially trained to counsel family members after a loved one’s death, providing education, support, and the tools people need to handle their grief in a way that helps them heal. In our Cup of Hope meetings, you can expect:

  • A confidential, supportive atmosphere where it’s safe to share your thoughts and feelings.
  • A place for you to share your story of loss.
  • Respect for your boundaries and comfort level.
  • An atmosphere that lets you know you are not alone.
  • Sharing of emotional tools to help you through the grieving process.

Cup of Hope

Will I ever feel normal again? I thought grief was an emotional process, so why do I feel physical pain? How long will this last?

The pain of grief is very real. Although grieving is a normal reaction to loss, it still feels very abnormal, and every grieving person handles the process at their own pace, in their own way.

You will find compassionate care at our Cup of Hope grief support group. Here, we welcome our patients, their loved ones, and anyone in the community who needs gentle help through the grieving process.

Meetings are free to attend and are held the fourth Wednesday of each month from 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and on the third Thursday of each month from 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. No pre-registration is required.

To learn more about our Grief Support programs or private counseling, please call 920-467-1800.

Our Bereavement Coordinator is specially trained to counsel family members after a loved one’s death, providing education, support, and the tools people need to handle their grief in a way that helps them heal. In our Cup of Hope meetings, you can expect:

  • A confidential, supportive atmosphere where it’s safe to share your thoughts and feelings.
  • A place for you to share your story of loss.
  • Respect for your boundaries and comfort level.
  • An atmosphere that lets you know you are not alone.
  • Sharing of emotional tools to help you through the grieving process.

Bereavement Care

This compassionate care is offered to the families of our patients for 13 months following the loss of a loved one. It includes spiritual and emotional support and education, giving families the support and tools they need to manage the grief process. Together, they work through the pain of their grief, maintaining a healthy connection to their past as they reinvest in their future.

To learn more about bereavement care or private counseling, please call 920-467-1800.

Bereavement Care

This compassionate care is offered to the families of our patients for 13 months following the loss of a loved one. It includes spiritual and emotional support and education, giving families the support and tools they need to manage the grief process. Together, they work through the pain of their grief, maintaining a healthy connection to their past as they reinvest in their future.

To learn more about bereavement care or private counseling, please call 920-467-1800.

Anticipatory Grief

Watching someone decline physically and emotionally can be one of the most difficult parts of the dying process. Your loved one may be present physically, but not mentally; their pain or advancing condition might prevent them from participating in a relationship that was once vibrant and rewarding.

This decline can often bring about feelings of loss as you grieve the changes in your loved one. This is called anticipatory grief, and much like grief, it affects people emotionally, spiritually and physically as loved ones, caregivers and the individual prepare for the next step.

If your loved one’s condition has advanced, please contact us at 920-467-1800 to determine whether hospice may be appropriate. Our hospice team can provide care for your loved one, in addition to supporting caregivers with respite care and education.

Anticipatory grief is a very real reaction to future loss and/or a loved one’s decline. Our palliative and hospice care team is here to help with supportive care and education during this process. As you deal with your loved one’s changing condition, here are a few ways to help you work through anticipatory grief:

  • Learn about your loved one’s condition: the symptoms, any medication side-effects, and the prognosis. Being informed will help you understand what is coming.
  • Take time for self-reflection. Acknowledge the loss, missed opportunities and accomplishments.
  • Take time to examine unresolved issues between you and your loved one. Also make time for life review, quality time, reminiscing and new moments to enjoy.
  • Be gentle and protect yourself. Address and express your fears, feelings, thoughts and tears. It’s OK to admit that you’re frustrated or uncertain, because these feelings are a normal part of anticipatory grief.
  • Do activities that serve your soul. It’s healthy to meet with friends and enjoy outside activities. Doing so gives more energy to care for your loved one.

Anticipatory Grief

Watching someone decline physically and emotionally can be one of the most difficult parts of the dying process. Your loved one may be present physically, but not mentally; their pain or advancing condition might prevent them from participating in a relationship that was once vibrant and rewarding.

This decline can often bring about feelings of loss as you grieve the changes in your loved one. This is called anticipatory grief, and much like grief, it affects people emotionally, spiritually and physically as loved ones, caregivers and the individual prepare for the next step.

If your loved one’s condition has advanced, please contact us at 920-467-1800 to determine whether hospice may be appropriate. Our hospice team can provide care for your loved one, in addition to supporting caregivers with respite care and education.

Anticipatory grief is a very real reaction to future loss and/or a loved one’s decline. Our palliative and hospice care team is here to help with supportive care and education during this process. As you deal with your loved one’s changing condition, here are a few ways to help you work through anticipatory grief:

  • Learn about your loved one’s condition: the symptoms, any medication side-effects, and the prognosis. Being informed will help you understand what is coming.
  • Take time for self-reflection. Acknowledge the loss, missed opportunities and accomplishments.
  • Take time to examine unresolved issues between you and your loved one. Also make time for life review, quality time, reminiscing and new moments to enjoy.
  • Be gentle and protect yourself. Address and express your fears, feelings, thoughts and tears. It’s OK to admit that you’re frustrated or uncertain, because these feelings are a normal part of anticipatory grief.
  • Do activities that serve your soul. It’s healthy to meet with friends and enjoy outside activities. Doing so gives more energy to care for your loved one.

Garden Remembrances

Grief is a reality when we experience the loss of a loved one, a relationship or a pet. The hospice hosts a signature summer event each July to offer our community members an opportunity to connect with community resources and learn healthy ways to cope with loss and grief while enjoying the beauty of our gardens. As well as honor those in our lives we have lost by the symbolic release of a live butterfly is the heart of the Garden Remembrances event.

Garden Remembrances

Grief is a reality when we experience the loss of a loved one, a relationship or a pet. The hospice hosts a signature summer event each July to offer our community members an opportunity to connect with community resources and learn healthy ways to cope with loss and grief while enjoying the beauty of our gardens. As well as honor those in our lives we have lost by the symbolic release of a live butterfly is the heart of the Garden Remembrances event.

Contact Us Today